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© 2017 by FLIGHT ARMOUR, LLC. 

Contact us: info@flightarmour.com

THE

FLIGHT ARMOUR 

ATHLETE

FLIGHT ARMOUR endeavors to protect athletes from clotting as they journey to and from events, with no performance penalty for having traveled.    While competitors suffer from jet lag, sluggish blood flow, dips in energy, and swollen limbs, OUR ATHLETES are ready to step off of the airplane and compete on the tarmac if necessary.

85% of AIR TRAVEL thrombosis victims are ATHLETIC, usually endurance athletes like marathoners.

It was recently shown that MLB pitchers who were pitching at home with JET LAG, gave up enough additional home runs to completely erase their home-field advantage.

DVT

DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS

4 REASONS WHY ATHLETES ARE SUSCEPTIBLE TO DVT

DVT is a condition in which a blood clot forms within a vein, potentially traveling to the lungs where it lodges, resulting in deadly pulmonary embolisms.

FLIGHT ARMOUR's combination of PINE BARK and NATTOKINASE reduces platelet aggregation and increases the activity of a blood flow-boosting enzyme that generates nitric oxide in vessels.  Additionally, it breaks down fibrin and fibrinogen, diminishing chances for plaque and red blood cell-induced clot formation.  (clinical test)

A clinical study has proven that the use of Pine Bark Extract is MORE EFFECTIVE than COMPRESSION SOCKS at reducing Thrombosis. (clinical test)

The need to travel long distances

Competitions are held across the globe, requiring athletes to take long flights to participate. The longer you don’t move, the greater your chances of developing a blood clot deep in the veins of your legs. A 2010 study investigated the effect of air travel on exercise-induced coagulation and fibrinolysis in endurance athletes. Results suggest that the combination of air travel and marathon running induces an acute hypercoagulable state, subjecting the traveling athlete to significant risk of deep vein thrombosis.   (see study)

Dehydration

Despite hydrating with water or sports drinks, it is still easy for high-performance athletes to sweat profusely and become dehydrated. Dehydration decreases plasma, the liquid portion of the blood, and increases blood’s thickness or stickiness. The thicker your blood becomes, the more likely it is that blood clots will form.

Injuries/surgeries

Despite diligent training and conditioning, competitive athletes frequently suffer injuries, including broken bones. Any injury to a vein or a severe muscle injury can increase the risk for developing DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis). The casts and braces needed to stabilize  broken bones limit your mobility, allowing your blood to pool, thereby increasing your risk.

Hormones

Female athletes may use hormone contraceptives during training and around competitive events to avoid menstruating at an inopportune time. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is rare, but taking birth control pills that contain estrogen or that combine estrogen and a progestin have been shown to increase the risk.

PROTECT AND PERFORM

In 8 subjects with abnormally high plasma fibrinogen, 20 mg of CURCUMIN for 15 days reduced fibrinogen levels by nearly 50%. Experiments using human platelets or whole blood have demonstrated curcumin's ability to inhibit platelet aggregation.

Enhance fibrinolysis and anti-coagulation with NATTOKINASE via several different pathways simultaneously, decreasing plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, and factor VIII.

COENZYME Q10 supplementation ameliorates inflammatory signaling and oxidative stress associated with strenuous exercise.  A study at the University of Granada, Spain, showed runners on CoQ10 to suffer less muscle damage and recover faster.

A study in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness shows the effectiveness of PINE BARK in improving overall fitness performance levels and recovery. A clinical trial found that an antioxidant from French maritime pine tree bark, is effective in improving performance and endurance and reducing muscle cramping and soreness by controlling oxidative stress—an imbalance between antioxidants and pro-oxidants in favor of the latter that can hinder the body’s ability to repair muscle damage.

  • People with slower resting heart rate are at greater risk of stasis, stagnant blood subject to clotting. Also, they are more likely to have bruises and sore muscles that can trigger clotting. No other risk factor comes close to this.

  • Adrenal fatigue is rampant in athletes. Adrenal fatigue causes low blood pressure, an excessively low pulse and consequent pooling of blood in the legs.

DVT

  • Athletes who are "blood doping", using a hormone called EPO, to increase their red blood cell volume. This thicker, stickier blood is very prone to clotting. 

  • Athletes may have better-developed superficial veins carrying more blood, reducing the flow in deep veins while at rest. 

BRIAN VICKERS

 "I had clots in my left leg, my lungs, even my finger," he says. "A clot actually went through my heart and into my left arm." Of the up to 600,000 people diagnosed with DVT annually in the United States, as many as 100,000 die from complications. 

CHRIS BOSH

When Chris Bosh was dealing with more than one blood clot he said that he felt written off by Miami Heat team doctors that advised him that the situation would likely be career-ending. "Clots were found, again," Bosh said. "My initial thoughts from it were, first of all, you have to be kidding. Secondly, this isn't real."

Perhaps the most well-known athlete to experience a blood clot is the tennis icon Serena Williams, who had life-threatening pulmonary embolism (PE) in 2011 after a foot injury and cross-country air travel. “I was on my death bed at one point – quite literally. I’ve had a serious illness, but at first I didn’t appreciate that,” 

SERENA WILLIAMS

REBEKAH BRADFORD

Even Olympic athletes are susceptible to dangerous blood clots. Olympic speed skater, two-time U.S. Sprint Champion and Master Sprint World Champion Rebekah Bradford, suffered clots that traveled through her bloodstream and lodged in both her lungs. Known as pulmonary embolism (PE), the situation almost put an end to not just her skating career, but also her life.

"The IRONMAN athlete is a perfect storm for a DVT.  Athletes undergo a certain amount of muscle damage in races, and are also likely dehydrated when they get back in a car or plane."  Dr. Jim Muntz  (Team Physician for the NBA Houston Rockets)

COMPETE. AGAIN AND AGAIN AND AGAIN.